What is Cognitive Wellness?

Cognitive wellness is enjoying good brain function which is responsible for memory, thinking clearly and learning.  Good brain health is also  helpful in regulating mood and as such assists in contributing to improved mental health.

We all want to retain our independence for as long as possible.  Many of us fear, as we age, becoming a burden to our family and loves ones.  Independence to us may include living alone, being able to cook for ourselves, deal with finances, do our own laundry, shop and even continue driving.

The 3 main considerations which contribute to good brain health:

  • Sleep
  • Activity
  • Diet

These three areas of course contribute to both our physical and cognitive health.  We also need to manage conditions such as hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes, heart conditions, obesity and depression.

In some instances, and under the consultation of medical professionals, medication is necessary and critical to manage certain conditions (eg type 1 diabetes). However improving diet and exercise can contribute towards improved physical and cognitive health.  It is never too late to change our behaviors and lifestyle for the better.

There are a number of research studies that have found evidence that more disrupted sleep was associated with worse cognitive function.(1) (2). A new study (3) found evidence the less older adults sleep, the faster their brains age.

Medication may not always need to be the first port of call when it comes to cognitive and physical health.  We should take the advice of medical professionals but if we do not give attention to Sleep, Activity levels and Diet we will suffer the consequences.

 

Dementia facts & Cost of assisted living in Utah South County

Dementia facts:

·         1 IN 3 SENIORS DIES WITH ALZHEIMER’S OR ANOTHER DEMENTIA. IT KILLS MORE THAN BREAST CANCER AND PROSTATE CANCER COMBINED.

·         Although there are various forms of dementia, around 70 percent of cases are due to Alzheimer’s. Of the remaining cases, the second most common type is vascular dementia.

·         One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer’s dementia.

·         Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women.

·         5.8 MILLION AMERICANS ARE LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S. BY 2050, THIS NUMBER IS PROJECTED TO RISE TO NEARLY 14 MILLION.

·         IN 2019, ALZHEIMER’S AND OTHER DEMENTIAS WILL COST THE NATION $290 BILLION. BY 2050, THESE COSTS COULD RISE AS HIGH AS $1.1 TRILLION.

·         BETWEEN 2000 AND 2017 DEATHS FROM HEART DISEASE HAVE DECREASED 9% WHILE DEATHS FROM ALZHEIMER’S HAVE INCREASED 145%.

·         ONLY 16% OF SENIORS RECEIVE REGULAR COGNITIVE ASSESSMENTS DURING ROUTINE HEALTH CHECK-UPS.

·         Every 65 SECONDS SOMEONE IN THE UNITED STATES DEVELOPS THE DISEASE.

Share This